“Go Wish”: The Game that Sparks Important End-of-Life Discussions

[pullquote] The value of Go Wish lies in the consideration and
conversations that it intends to inspire. [/pullquote]

Dr. Jessica Zitter writes about the importance of sharing/teaching end of life information with younger
people. She has started to go into high schools to do this. Whenever I have younger people in my
audiences when I present, I make a point of talking with them afterward. They are quite comfortable
with the information. They don’t want people their families or friends to suffer at the end of life.

Go Wish is a card game that broaches difficult questions about end of life and what is most important to
the participants. Created by the Coda Alliance, a community-based, non-profit organization that
promotes the planning and preparation for the individual’s ideal death, Go Wish has a simple but
effective construct. Each card presents a statement related to end-of- life decisions and it is up to the
individual player to sort it into piles based on importance. For example, statements written on the cards
may include “To have my family with me”, “To have a nurse I feel comfortable with”, “To take care of
unfinished business with my family and friends”. The value of Go Wish lies in the consideration and
conversations that it intends to inspire.

Considering one’s own death is daunting, maybe frightening, and often avoided. However, Go Wish
encourages each participant to reflect on their own priorities and needs, and comfort zones. By openly discussing the topic, the intention is that participants will feel less anxiety having
taken the time to deliberately contemplate and record their most important values at the end of life.
The conversations between family members and friends that follow will ease the minds of those who
may someday be placed in a position to help their loved one at the end of life.

Decks of Go Wish cards are available for purchase (in multiple languages) and to play for free on their
website, www.gowish.org ! When playing the free game alone online, it is even possible to print a copy
of how you sorted each statement by importance. You can then keep it in your personal important files,
and share it with family and friends. Visit their website for testimonials and examples of how to use the
cards to spark conversations about end-of- life decisions, options, and values!