End of Life Option Debating Begins in Massachusetts

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He said he watched his father die painfully of prostate cancer. In his final month of life, he said, his father, as he withered away, was either sedated or awake in severe pain. He told his family, “It’s taking me too long to die.”

Ruby said his mother, now 93, told him, “Don’t let this happen to me.”

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As states are beginning to pass end of life option acts, debates are beginning for how to fund end of life option programs.

In Massachusetts, as many states are beginning to pass end of life option acts, debates are beginning for funding end of life option programs with surveys from 25,000 physicians and medical students. It is notable that more and more people want end of life options. Positive physician-patient relationships regarding end of life are dependent on having your personal wishes written in an advance health directive. It is the only way to have a clear communication about your wishes at the end of life. Debates go both ways, but end of life options are important for everyone. There is no one choice.  For people suffering with terminal illnesses,  their last days can turn into months if doctors keep them alive with invasive procedures rather than focusing on the best quality of death. The end of life movement is creating compassionate conversation. No one wants to suffer at the end of their life. 

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